Why dignity can’t be ‘delivered’.

By Liz Lloyd

For many years, dignity in care has been a core policy aim as well as the focus of commissions and working parties. In 2012 the UK’s Commission on Dignity in Care for Older People pointed out the breadth and depth of cultural change that would be required to secure dignified care for older people and argued that deep-seated age discrimination and stereotyping of older people were major barriers. The Commission took the view that to shift stereotypical views of old age it is necessary to show that not all older people are frail and dependent and, moreover, that older people evidently make a positive contribution to society through unpaid work and community activities. These are important points but do not add up to an adequate basis for shifting attitudes towards those who are frail and dependent. True, a cross-section of people aged over 70 will show varying levels of health and capacity for self-care but it is also true that everybody aged over 70 will at some point need care. Indeed, the same applies to all age groups although the need for care is increasingly postponed until old age. Thus, we need a different way of conceptualising dignity so that we do not always associate it with self-reliance but acknowledge its relevance in the context of dependency on others, because dependency is part of what it is to be human.

Dignity is a personal concept, involving individual identity and self-respect. The potential for a loss of personal dignity increases with age, as health declines and people live with and eventually die with or from a range of conditions. Falls, continence problems and loss of mobility, for example, affect individual self-respect in profound ways. But dignity is also a social concept, involving social and cultural practices, institutional systems and interpersonal behaviour. Personal and social meanings of dignity are strongly entwined. Importantly, in both personal and social meanings, dignity is relevant to those who provide care as well as those who receive it. The dignity of the care worker is enhanced when their job is done well and diminished when it is not, such as when a worker has insufficient time to attend to anything other than the older person’s basic functional needs. The economic and political contexts that prioritise constraints on public spending make it harder to overcome barriers to dignity in care for both the care worker and the older person.

To overcome the loss of dignity associated with declining health, older people typically make strenuous efforts to avoid becoming a burden on others.  But, at the same time, they need to adjust to their changing circumstances and learn to accept help. Striking the right balance between these twin obligations is a complex and deeply personal matter. People’s perceptions of how they wish to be supported are influenced by family ties, social and cultural background, migration experience and individual life histories. What might appear insignificant to a care provider might be deeply significant to the older person.

We should not underestimate the importance to personal dignity of the style of communication between front-line staff and older people. However, the complex issues faced by older people when health declines requires those in health and care services not simply to check their actions against a list of standards but to engage with the complexities of individual people’s lives. Understanding the impact of loss and change and helping people make the difficult decisions that follow can be an important basis for care that maintains dignity. Above all, this needs to be done not because we should behave well towards them but because frailty and dependency are part of us all.

Liz Lloyd

10th March 2014

 

 

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